all over the world

this is our Health care right now

 

Her twitter handle is ER Shit Magnet

She works as an ER Nurse in a big city in the US

 

Coded a COVID-19 symptoms patient. In his 20’s. We didn’t have enough gear or time to find PPE so 2 nurses were compressing him without masks on while the doc slammed on a PAPR without the fan to intubate. Bloody emesis sprayed on the staff.

Takaya the wolf was shot dead by a hunter

Screen caps of Dr. Josh Lerner’s home page on Facebook, forwarded by Amanda Guinzburg @Guinz on twitter

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Will the pandemic produce its own corona baby boom generation?

asked Michael Balter on twitter

That is the funniest question, all those assumptions.

 

NOT

VOLUNTARILY

 

The birth rate will go up in some places, actually a lot in some places, but they won’t be places where the survival rate of the children is likely to be very high, because of future pandemics, the social chaos brought on by the current pandemic, and climate change, which is not likely to back off just because we’re all having a horrible year. What you’re doing, when you’re being a hypothetical god of ideas looking at a screen upon which moves a nineteen year old Bengali woman who looks forty and has three kids in the ground already, is demonstrating readiness to be calmly philosophical about real human suffering, which I suppose is a great psychological advantage in this dress rehearsal for the fucking end times.

Anywhere there exists effective birth control, civic order, and interpersonal alternatives to the standardized hegemonic heterosexual-congress-while-married rules with which lovers of liberty must inevitably come into conflict, (ha ha, a little levity in the midst of this panorama of disease, greed and contempt) the birth rate’s gonna plummet. It will blip in a couple of years due to pent up demand and glue for new marriages for the sudden crop of ‘fuck I’m in my 30’s, a parent and I /we lost a partner’ 2nd marriages we’ll see over the next three years.

I believe industrialized world women who up until last Christmas were planning children are going to watch the slow motion chaos of the US response and think, no, I don’t think so. They will watch the global economy collapse and realize that they have a choice about whether they want to bring their kids into this mess or not. Especially after what I imagine will be more than one mass murder event in a major American hospital, when masked gunmen walk in and kill everyone they can find to ‘start a race war’ or ‘stop the hoax’ or whatever toxic bullshit youtube’s spun them up on.

As things go bad, we’re going to see the children of single parents who’ve died during the pandemic disappear into child trafficking, sex and cooking and agricultural slavery, and many women will say, if they have a choice, that they don’t want to make food for Moloch, the devouring god that modern capitalism always was before it became too big to fail. They won’t want to be forced into sex work to feed their children. And as the welfare state implodes, there will be fewer and fewer opportunities, so why bring a child into that? The wealth transfer from the older generations who are dying in higher numbers for this pandemic  will come in the form of property, which is great, but there won’t be any cash, so nothing to start a new life with.

Also, modern men are trash. They do not know how to give head, they are unclean, jealous, spendthrift, cowardly, lazy and a sack of wet mice does better on an LSAT. Why would any woman in her right fucking mind want a child with one?

There won’t be any decent pre-natal care because there already aren’t enough obstetricians and up to four percent of them will die in the next eighteen months since the US is having such shitty outcomes for coronavirus when it gets to ARDS. After that, we’ll have a vaccine, yippee! With more than a 15% refusal rate, because it is imbedding a chip into us! Boo. And then after that, the general strikes, the food riots, more wars, and then – the real pandemic, which has yet to arise.


Could be Tennessee, could be Indonesia, could be China, could be Canada. We don’t know where the next one is coming from, and it will be coming into a world stronger in some ways in its response than today, but in many other ways weaker. We’re not coming back from this. Mass unemployment, structural unemployment on a scale not seen before in industrialized societies, will be a continuing feature of life, because pandemics will force so many people to stay home for at least one fifth of the next decade.

Also, this pandemic is leaving kids under five alone.  If you think the next one will be so kindly, Atropos would like a word.

Atropos, from a mosaic from the House of Theseus in Paphos

So no; there won’t be a baby boom. But isn’t it pretty to think that capitalism, after having shit on women in general and women of colour in particular, expects us feeeemales to do our duty to throw babies on Moloch’s pyre. Now why the fuck would any sensible woman do that. seriously

 

why

 

List of essential businesses

From the city of Burnaby website

 

IF an order is issued for non-essential businesses to close, only those designated businesses should remain open.  In advance of such an order,the provincial government has released the list of essential businesses in BC.  The Burnaby Board of Trade encourages you to use this list to prepare a plan for how you will communicate to your employees and customers if you need to shut down, or plan for how you will remain open if allowed.

Any business NOT on the list, IS currently allowed to STAY OPEN provided if it can adapt its services and workplace to the orders and recommendations around social distancing (2 metres between patrons) and crowd size.

In addition to this list, the following businesses have already been ordered to close:  Restaurants (except for take-out/delivery) / Bars, pubs and nightclubs / Entertainment venues (theatres, concert halls, etc.) / Casinos / Personal service establishments (barbershops, hair and nail salons, tattoo shops, spas, etc.)

Consult the list below to see if your business is on the list.  It is a long list, so we encourage you to hit “Control” + “F” on your computer to do a keyword search to find your business or sector.

List of BC Essential Businesses 

Health and health services

Direct-to-public health services

  • all health-care services, including acute care (hospitals), secondary/long-term care, coroners’ services, health-care providers working within and outside an acute care setting and other health services, including public health, detox facilities, safe-injection sites, COVID-19 testing, clinical research supporting the COVID-19 response, blood/plasma donation services and emergency pre-hospitalization services;
  • other health services and caregivers (e.g., physicians, dentists, psychiatrists, psychologists, mid-level practitioners, nurses and assistants, infection-control and quality-assurance personnel, pharmacists, physical and occupational therapists and assistants, social workers, mental-health and substance-use workers, including peer support workers, speech pathologists, diagnostic and therapeutic technicians and technologists, counsellors, chiropractors, naturopaths, dentists, crisis centres, outreach workers, overdose and harm-reduction services, meal programs; and
  • health first responders (paramedics).

Health service providers

  • pharmaceutical production, medical laboratories/research, medical testing, pharmacies, medical supply and equipment manufacturers, wholesale, distribution and stores, and analytical testing labs related to testing of finished product for pathogens and contaminants;
  • safety supply (e.g., work clothes, personal protective equipment, medical/pharmaceutical/ laboratory supplies, etc.) stores, manufacturers, technicians, logistics and warehouse operators;
  • medical wholesale and distribution; and
  • health plans, billing and health information.

Law enforcement, public safety, first responders, emergency response personnel

  • first responders, including police, fire and those services providing for public safety, including commercial vehicle safety enforcement, corrections and detainment facilities, park rangers, security and protective services, court services, bylaw enforcement, as well as communications/dispatching support for first responders and volunteers, such as search-and-rescue and public-safety lifeline volunteers;
  • public-sector workers for peace, order and good government, and employees of contracted service providers in these fields, including maintenance of technical infrastructure to support this work and compliance with health and public-safety orders;
  • businesses that provide support to police and correctional services;
  • operations and services in support of the Canadian Armed Forces and Canadian Border Services Agency;
  • emergency management personnel at local, regional and provincial levels;
  • businesses that ensure global continuity of supply of aggregates to support critical infrastructure repairs and emergency response requirements (e.g., sandbags, armour stone barriers, etc.); and
  • equipment and uniform suppliers for first responders.

Vulnerable population service providers

  • businesses and non-profits that provide food, shelter, social and support services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise vulnerable individuals, such as:
    • food banks, community kitchens, and voluntary and community service providers;
    • residential health facilities, mental-health, substance-use and addictions services;
    • transitional, social and supportive housing, and single-room occupancy housing;
  • community services and outreach for immigrants, refugees, vulnerable populations and non-market housing, including businesses that sell, rent or repair assistive/mobility/medical devices, aids and/or supplies;
  • care for seniors, adults, children or individuals with disabilities;
  • child care services for those persons providing essential services;
  • caregivers for children in care and out of care;
  • elder and disability care, including disabled service support for people with physical and cognitive disabilities;
  • residential care for individuals with mental health and substance use challenges, including licensed and registered treatment and recovery facilities;
  • government and non-profit service delivery staff who provide access to income supports for people in need of food and shelter;
  • residential and care facilities and shelters for seniors, adults, children and people with disabilities;
  • overdose prevention sites, clinical overdose prevention services or medical marijuana provision; and
  • businesses that sell, rent or repair assistive/mobility/medical devices, aids and/or supplies, or other products/services that support the health sector, including mental-health and addictions/counselling supports.

Critical infrastructure service providers

  • infrastructure, drilling and production, refineries, processing, completion facilities, utilities, transportation, transmission, stations and storage facilities critical in supporting daily essential electricity needs, drinking water, waste water, electricity (including associated infrastructure), steam, alternative energy production, waste and hazardous management, industrial recycling, oil and natural and propane gas, fuel and other fuel sources, such as heating oil and wood pellets, as well as operating staff;
  • manufacturing of goods necessary for the continued and immediate operation of other essential infrastructure and businesses;
  • gas stations, diesel, propane and heating fuel providers including providers of motor vehicle, aircraft and water/marine fuels, and providers of charging stations for electric vehicles; and
  • operations and employees needed to operate and maintain drinking water and wastewater/drainage infrastructure, including:
    • operational staff at water authorities;
    • operational staff at community water systems;
    • operational staff at wastewater treatment facilities;
    • workers repairing water and wastewater conveyances and performing required sampling or monitoring;
    • operational staff for water distribution and testing;
    • operational staff at wastewater collection facilities;
    • operational staff and technical support for supervisory control and data-acquisition control systems;
    • chemical disinfectant suppliers for wastewater and personnel protection; and
    • workers who maintain digital systems infrastructure supporting water and wastewater operations.

Food and agriculture service providers

  • food cultivation, including farming, livestock, aquaculture and fishing, and businesses that support the food supply chain, as well as community gardens and subsistence agriculture;
  • food processing, manufacturing, storage and distribution of foods, feed products and beverages;
  • workers essential to maintaining or repairing equipment in food processing and distribution centres;
  • workers, including temporary foreign workers, to support agricultural operations to enhance food security;
  • retail: grocery stores, convenience stores, farmers markets and other establishments engaged in the retail sale or provision of food, pet or livestock supply, liquor, cannabis (including producers), and any other household consumer products, such as cleaning and personal care products.
    • includes stores that sell groceries and also sell other non-grocery products, and products necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation and essential daily operation of residences. such as home supply, hardware, building material stores, pawn brokers, and garden centres and nurseries;
  • farming supply, including seed, fertilizer, pesticides, farm-machinery sales and maintenance;
  • inspection services and associated regulatory and government workforce and supporting businesses required for slaughter of animals, dairy production and food safety; and
  • businesses that provide for the health and welfare of animals, including veterinarians, farms, boarding kennels, stables, animal shelters, zoos, aquariums, research facilities and other service providers.

Transportation, infrastructure and manufacturing

  • supply chain services needed to supply goods for societal functioning, including cooling, storing, packaging, transportation, warehousing and distribution;
  • workers who support the maintenance and operation of cargo transportation services, including crews, maintenance, operations and other facilities workers;
  • manufacturers and distributors (to include service centres and related operations) of packaging materials, pallets, crates, containers and other supplies needed to support manufacturing, packaging staging and distribution operations;
  • truck drivers who haul hazardous and waste materials to support critical infrastructure, capabilities, functions, and municipal and provincial services;
  • local, regional, and provincial delivery services, including but not limited to businesses that ship or deliver groceries, food, goods or services directly to business and residences and mailing and shipping services;
  • services to support and enable transportation, including highway, road, bridge maintenance and repair;
  • employees who repair, maintain and overhaul vehicles, aircraft and parts, rail equipment, marine vessels, and the equipment and infrastructure that enables operations that encompass movement of cargo and passengers, as well as vehicle rentals and leasing;
  • services that facilitate the transportation of essential supplies, personnel and services, including port/waterfront operations, road, air and rail operations;
  • facilities supporting interprovincial and intra-provincial delivery of goods, including truck scales, commercial vehicle inspection stations, brokerages, truck towing and repair services, commercial cardlock fuel providers, truck and rest stops;
  • government-owned or leased buildings;
  • businesses that supply other essential businesses and people working from home with the support or supplies necessary to operate;
  • private transportation services, such as taxis, ride-hailing, helicopter, aircraft and marine vessels;
  • public transportation services under rules for physical distancing or other recommendations from the PHO;
  • workers supporting the chemical and industrial gas supply chains, including workers at chemical manufacturing plants, workers in laboratories, workers at distribution facilities, workers who transport basic raw chemical materials to the producers of industrial and consumer goods and support the natural resource sector, as well as workers supporting safety at such facilities;
  • provision of public services that support the safe operation of regulated businesses and the provision of public services that support those businesses to meet other regulatory requirements;
  • workers who support the operation, inspection, and maintenance of essential public works facilities and operations;
  • workers who support the inspection and maintenance for ongoing safety at industrial facilities;
  • inspectors who ensure worksites are safe and health for workers, and who investigate serious workplace accidents;
  • workers who process and manage claims made by injured workers, including services related to their care and treatment, as well as the provision of workers’ compensation benefits;
  • hotels and places of accommodation;
  • activities of the consuls general and staff who support the work of the consuls general;
  • landlords of buildings where the consulates are located and those who must guarantee access to consular offices as well as the operation of the consular offices;
  • storage for essential businesses;
  • businesses that provide materials and services for the operation, maintenance and safety of transportation systems (road, transit, rail, air and marine) including delivery of maintenance services, such as clearing snow, response to collisions and completing needed repairs to transportation systems;
  • businesses that extract, manufacture, process and distribute goods, products, equipment and materials, including businesses that manufacture inputs to other manufacturers (e.g., primary metal/steel, blow moulding, component manufacturers, chemicals, etc., that feed the end-product manufacturer);
  • vegetation management crews and traffic workers who support environmental remediation/monitoring and who respond to environmental emergencies;
  • businesses providing staffing services, including temporary labour services; and
  • businesses that support the safe operations of residences, essential businesses and facilities/buildings.

Sanitation

  • cleaning services necessary to provide and maintain disinfection;
  • manufacturing of sanitary products, household paper products, chemicals, microelectronics/semi-conductor, including companies able to retrofit their production facilities to produce goods/services that can be used to address critical shortages of sanitary and protective goods;
  • businesses that support environmental management/monitoring and spill cleanup and response, including environmental consulting firms, professional engineers and geoscientists, septic haulers, well drillers, pesticides applicators and exterminators, management of industrial sewage/effluent (e.g., for mining operations) and environmental laboratories; and
  • waste (garbage and organics) and recycling collection, processing and disposal.

Communications, information sharing and information technology (IT)

  • workers maintaining IT and communications infrastructure for medical facilities, governments facilities, emergency response and command agencies, energy and utilities, banks and financial institutions, employees working from home, and other critical infrastructure categories and personnel, including managing information and cyber-security incidents;
  • newspapers, television, radio, online news outlets and other media services;
  • IT, radio, cable providers and telecommunications services, including phone, internet, wireless communications and data centres; and
  • satellite operations, undersea cable landing stations, internet exchange points, and manufacturers and distributors of communications equipment.

Non-health essential service providers

  • feed, water, bedding, veterinary care, veterinary supply, transport and processing services for livestock, animal shelters and pets;
  • coroners and workers performing mortuary services, including funeral homes, crematoriums and cemeteries, as well as workers supporting the appropriate handling, identification, storage, transportation and certification of human remains;
  • banks and their branches, credit unions and related financial institutions, as well as workers who support security and technical operations supporting financial institutions;
  • capital markets, including the British Columbia Securities Commission, self-regulatory organizations, exchanges, clearing agencies and investment-fund dealers, advisers and managers;
  • services related to bankruptcy/credit restructuring and non-bank sources of capital, cheque-cashing outlets, money sending and money remittance services, currency exchange services, pawn brokers;
  • accounting, payroll, translation services, legal services and insurance providers; insurance assessment and adjudication providers;
  • plumbers, electricians, elevator maintenance providers, exterminators, property management services, custodial/janitorial workers, cleaning services, fire safety and sprinkler systems, building systems maintenance and repair technicians, engineers, mechanics, smelters and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation and daily essential operation of residences and commercial buildings;
  • educational institutions — including public and private K-12 schools, and public post-secondary institutions — for purposes of facilitating remote learning or performing essential functions, including services that are needed to ensure the safety, security, welfare, integrity and health of the community, property and research and certain operational and contractual activities, if operating under rules for physical distancing or other recommendations from the PHO;
  • in relation to research universities, services including COVID-19-related research, residential housing and food services for students on campus, building operations and risk management, animal care services, health services for students, IT including data security and infrastructure, finance/payroll/administration/HR/communications and child care for essential university staff;
  • laundromats, dry cleaners and laundry service providers;
  • restaurants and other facilities that prepare and serve food, if operating under rules for social and physical distancing or other recommendations from the PHO;
  • towing services and other vehicle repair/maintenance operations;
  • schools and other entities that provide free food services to students or members of the public, if operating under rules for physical distancing or other recommendations from the PHO;
  • construction work, in accordance with PHO direction, construction firms, skilled trades and professionals, and construction and light industrial machinery and equipment rental;
  • businesses that ensure global continuity of supply of primary and value-added forestry/silviculture products (e.g., lumber, pulp, paper, wood fuel, etc.) including soft-pulp products, such as protective masks, gowns, drapes, screens and other hospital supplies, as well as household paper products;
  • postal services, including both public and private mailing, shipping, logistics, courier, delivery services and post office boxes;
  • research services supporting essential sectors, including medical/clinical research and industrial research;
  • all government (local, regional, provincial) functions or services;
  • businesses and non-profits that provide support services to citizens and businesses on behalf of government – these include but are not limited to: income assistance and disability assistance, pensions, residential tenancy, BC Services Card, drivers’ licensing, Affordable Child Care Benefit, Medical Services Plan, forest-worker support programs, notary, commissioner, affidavits, pesticide exams, invigilation for essential trades, 1 888 COVID19, verify by video, and helpdesk for BCeID;
  • weather forecasters;
  • businesses that ensure global continuity of supply of mining materials and products (e.g., metals such as copper, nickel and gold) and that support supply chains including
    • mining operations, production and processing;
    • mineral exploration and development; and
    • mining supply and services that support supply chains in the mining industry including maintenance of operations, health and safety;
  • workers at operations centres necessary to maintain other essential functions;
  • professional services, including lawyers and paralegals, engineers, accountants, translators;
  • land registration services and real estate agent services;
  • building code enforcement, inspection of buildings, building sites and building systems by building officials and registered professionals (architects and engineers);
  • public washrooms and hygiene facilities (toilets, handwash stations, showers) for unsheltered persons; and
  • parks and green space for public health and sheltering (for people experiencing homelessness).

More and more convinced

That I’ve already had the virus. Since I don’t know if I’m still shedding, I’m staying indoors anyway. I do feel physically better than I did last week in almost every way, although psychologically…. I mean people looking at Hitler couldn’t believe him, because he was so outside the norm of politicians, and now I’m pretty much the same with the Orange Twitler. My disbelief keeps hanging me up. I want to wake up. There is no waking up. There is only living through this.

Nathan Vincent’s ‘Manly Doilies’ (there are others, have fun)

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Helen Branswell, one of my twitter gurus since Ebola (she’s Canadian, makes sense, lives in Boston, good science writer) has a thing or two to say.

I hope that the health care workers get more PPE soon.

I have a horrible horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach, that this time next year most of the disabled people I follow on twitter will be dead and I’m pre-crazy with grief about it because they’ve taught me so much and I’ve only made donations to a couple of them.

I did donate to anti COVID efforts on the DTES yesterday.

In other news, snitch-taggery rhymes with douche-baggery.

England is changing who is being assigned as cause of  death coronavirus on the basis of three of the flimsiest reasons

 

my email of today to some fuckwit at Kent State U whose name I shall redact. It is a variation on the modern standard: Were you FUCKING HIGH??

 

Are YOU the dean who sent out an email this week…..

demanding that your staff ACCELERATE THEIR RESEARCH during a pandemic which has forced every academic into distance learning?
If so, I would like you to tell me what you’ve been prescribed that makes you so disconnected from reality. I would like to provide the name of the drug, or drugs, to my physician, as damn, they seem to be working well.
If not, perhaps you can pass the message along to senior officers of the university that demands like that are ludicrous, insensitive, unrealistic and are NOT going to look good on anyone’s academic resumé.
Yours truly,
Allegra Sloman
Vancouver Canada
Tom Humberstone drew this for The Nib this past week:

 

today’s status

Image result for images pink fairy armadillo

But first, a pink fairy armadillo

Virtually everyone in my novels is suffering from a major mental illness, I only just realized that now, and alien hero George veers between coldly civil rationality/urbanity, and florid, bug-eyed, narcissistic, consensus-reality-evasion.

Well, he didn’t start off knowing that his bug-eyed crazy mother had DRUGGED HIM and his mate-to-be, to sequester them so they couldn’t breed with anyone else. Or that he had two occult siblings living inside him, only one of whom he could actually communicate with, and that poorly. And he went wackdoodle IN SPACE when they left him; and then his mate shoved him out the airlock in the equivalent of a rhinohide drop ship with a gumwad for a parachute.

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Processed using calibrated polarized near-infrared (CB2, MT2) filtered images of Saturn taken by Cassini on November 17 2012.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/CICLOPS/Kevin M. Gill from twitter today